big list of human foods that dogs can and cant eat

Human Foods Dogs Can and Cannot Eat: Complete List, According to a Veterinarian

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There are some human foods that dogs can eat safely, as well as some human foods that dogs shouldn’t eat. If you have a dog, you might be used to seeing adorable puppy eyes begging for a bite of, well, anything that you happen to be eating. While it’s natural to want to share with your best pal, some human foods are toxic to dogs. Some foods that are delicious to you are harmful to your pup due to our physiological differences. Other human foods, while not toxic, are still potentially dangerous for dogs because they are hard to digest or contain high levels of fat, for example.

As a pet parent, it can be overwhelming to remember what foods are safe for dogs and which foods are toxic to dogs, so we have created this guide to help you decide what you can share and what to keep out of your dog’s reach.

Always keep in mind that new foods of any kind, including switching to a different dog food, can cause stomach upset. When you find a human food you’d like to share with your pup, go slowly. Give small amounts at first and watch for any problems like vomiting or diarrhea before giving more. Also, remember that treats should make up less than ten percent of your dog’s diet, so all of the foods that are safe for your dog should be given in moderation to avoid weight gain and nutrient excesses and deficiencies.

Keep reading to learn what foods are safe for dogs and what foods dogs shouldn’t eat.

Fruits Dogs Can and Cannot Eat

Bananas

Yes, but not the peels.

banana
Image courtesy of Pixabay

Yes, bananas are one of the human foods dogs can eat. This fruit is high in potassium, and bananas also contain vitamin C, vitamin B6, protein, fiber, and other nutrients that dogs need. Dogs also tend to love bananas as a sweet, healthy treat. Note that dogs should only eat peeled bananas, however, since the peels can cause an obstruction. 1

Apples

Yes, but not the stem, seeds, or core. 

apple
Image courtesy of Pixabay

Yes, dogs can eat apples, minus the seeds, stem, and core. They are sweet and crunchy, and they contain vitamin A, vitamin C, and fiber, which your dog needs for good health. They can even help clean plaque from teeth due to their texture. Dogs should not eat large numbers of seeds, however. 2

Strawberries

Yes, strawberries are safe for dogs to eat. 

strawberries
Image courtesy of Pixabay

Yes, dogs can eat strawberries. They are low in calories and high in antioxidants, so they’ll help keep your dog healthy and at a healthy weight. Thaw some unsweetened frozen strawberries for a sweet reminder of summer any time of the year. 3

Watermelon

Yes, but not the seeds or rind. 

watermelon
Image courtesy of Pixabay

Yes, dogs can eat watermelon, but not the rind or large numbers of seeds. This fruit is full of water, hence the name, making it a great snack on a hot day to help keep your pup well-hydrated. Watermelon contains potassium and several types of vitamins. Don’t give your dog the rind, however; stick to the red flesh. 4

Blueberries

Yes, but not the stems or leaves. 

blueberries
Image courtesy of Pixabay

Yes, blueberries are one of the foods dogs can eat. They are chock-full of fiber, vitamin C, and antioxidants, to name just a few of the benefits. They are also the perfect size to use as a treat for a dog of any size. Don’t feed your dog large numbers of stems or leaves, though, as they can cause an obstruction. 5

Oranges

Yes, peeled oranges are safe for dogs to eat. 

oranges
Image courtesy of Pixabay

Yes, dogs can eat peeled oranges. They should not eat the stems, leaves, or skins because they are irritating. The fruit itself is sweet, though, and dogs tend to like it. Tangerines and clementines are good snacks, too. Give these in moderation because some dogs won’t digest them well and they are fairly high in sugar. 6

Grapes

No, grapes are toxic to dogs. 

grapes
Image courtesy of Pixabay

No, grapes and raisins are among the human foods that dogs shouldn’t eat. They can cause kidney failure in some dogs, though the exact toxin involved is currently unknown. Do not feed your dog grapes or raisins as a treat or leave them where he can get to them. 7

Pineapple

Yes, dogs can eat the flesh of a pineapple. 

pineapple
Image courtesy of Pixabay

Yes, dogs can eat peeled and cored pineapple. This is a very nutrient-dense fruit and is filled with minerals that your dog needs for good health. Keep in mind, however, that it is also high in sugars and can cause digestive upset in some dogs. 8

Avocado

Yes, but only in limited amounts. 

avocado
Image courtesy of Pixabay

Yes, dogs can eat small amounts of avocado. While many people think that avocado is toxic to dogs, the flesh of the fruit (the green, inner part) has far less toxin than the skin, pit, and leaves. Avocado flesh is high in fat, however, so only give your dog a small amount. 9

Mangoes

Yes, dogs can eat peeled mangoes in moderation, but not the pits. 

mangoes
Image courtesy of Pixabay

Yes, dogs can eat mangoes. They are high in fiber and vitamins, so they make a nutritious – and delicious – treat for your dog. Since they are high in sugar, you should give them sparingly, however. Also, the skin is difficult to digest, so peel mangoes for your dog and cut the flesh into small pieces. Finally, don’t let your dog eat the pit since it can cause an obstruction. 10

Peaches

Yes, dogs can eat peaches, but not the pits. 

peaches
Image courtesy of Pixabay

Yes, dogs can eat peaches. The flesh is sweet and appealing to dogs, and it also contains vitamins and minerals that your dog needs. It has a lot of sugar, though, so keep it as a treat. Also, avoid canned peaches, which often contain lots of sugar or potentially harmful artificial sweeteners. And do not let your dog eat the pits, which are toxic and also pose a risk of choking or obstruction. 11

Cherries

Yes, dogs can eat cherries, but not the pits. 

cherries
Image courtesy of Pixabay

Yes, dogs can eat cherries. The flesh of the cherry is fine for dogs to have, but the pit contains small amounts of cyanide and is also a choking or obstruction hazard. Eating one pit likely won’t harm your dog, but if he eats several, be on the lookout for signs of cyanide poisoning, which include labored breathing, dark red mucous membranes, and dilated pupils. 12

Cantaloupe

Yes, but not the seeds or rind. 

cantaloupe
Image courtesy of Pixabay

Yes, dogs can eat cantaloupe. It contains beneficial vitamins and minerals, and it’s also full of water, which makes small amounts a good choice for dogs who are overweight or prone to gaining weight. Feed this fruit in moderation and avoid large numbers of seeds because they can obstruct the gastrointestinal tract of small dogs. (The seeds are not toxic to dogs, however.) 13

Pears

Yes, but not the seeds or core.

pear
Image courtesy of Pixabay

Yes, dogs can eat pears. Pears are sweet, soft, and juicy, and many dogs love them. Be aware that their seeds contain cyanide, so avoid letting your dog eat the core (although in all honesty, it would take a lot of seeds to cause problems). A slice every once in a while is a good way to treat your dog in moderation. 14

Blackberries

Yes, blackberries are safe for dogs to eat. 

blackberries
Image courtesy of Pixabay

Yes, blackberries are one of the human foods dogs can eat. These contain vitamin C, fiber, and other nutrients that your dog needs. They also contain antioxidants, which are great for aging dogs, in particular. 15

Raspberries

Yes, dogs can eat raspberries. 

raspberries
Image courtesy of Pixabay

Yes, dogs can eat raspberries. They contain many of the same nutrients as other berries, including fiber, vitamin C, and various antioxidants. You may have heard that raspberries contain small amounts of naturally occurring xylitol. While xylitol can be toxic to dogs, they would have to eat pounds and pounds of raspberries before even getting close to a dangerous level of xylitol. So, feel free to give your dog a few raspberries as a treat. 16

Vegetables Dogs Can and Cannot Eat

Tomatoes

Yes, tomatoes are safe for dogs to eat. 

tomato
Image courtesy of Pixabay

Yes, tomatoes are safe for dogs to eat, but dogs can’t eat the stems or other parts of the plant. That’s because the other parts of the plant contain a compound called solanine, which is toxic to dogs in large doses. Green tomatoes contain small amounts of solanine, too. 17

Carrots

Yes, carrots are safe for dogs to eat. 

carrot
Image courtesy of Pixabay

Yes, dogs can eat carrots. In fact, these make a great snack for dogs and contain vitamin A, beta carotene, and other nutrients; just make sure that smaller dogs don’t choke or swallow large pieces of raw carrots. Slice them or cook them to make them safe for your dog. 18

Broccoli

Yes, broccoli is safe for dogs to eat. 

broccoli
Image courtesy of Pixabay

Yes, dogs can eat broccoli. You can give them cooked or raw florets – just don’t add any seasoning. The stalks can be a choking or obstruction hazard, however, so stick to small pieces or florets only. Also, don’t overdo it, as too much broccoli (more than 25 percent of your dog’s diet) can be toxic to dogs. 19

Mushrooms

Yes, but store-bought only: wild mushrooms can be toxic to dogs. 

mushroom
Image courtesy of Pixabay

Yes, dogs can eat mushrooms, provided they are store-bought cultivars. Do not ever let your dog eat mushrooms that you find wild outside, as many of these are toxic to dogs (as well as to humans). 20

Celery

Yes, celery is safe for dogs to eat. 

celery
Image courtesy of Pixabay

Yes, celery is safe for dogs to eat. Celery contains fiber and a lot of water, so it is a nice, hydrating snack for dogs who like it. Cut it into small pieces or peel it first, however, to prevent obstruction. 21

Cucumbers

Yes, cucumbers are safe for dogs to eat. 

cucumber
Image courtesy of Pixabay

Yes, dogs can eat cucumbers. Cucumbers are a great snack for dogs who need some extra hydration. They are crunchy and contain a lot of vitamins; they are also very low in calories and make a good treat for an overweight dog. Keep in mind that too much can cause diarrhea, though. 22

Potatoes

Yes, dogs can eat potatoes, but only if they’re cooked. 

potato
Image courtesy of Pixabay

Yes, dogs can eat potatoes, provided that they are cooked. Raw potatoes, as well as potatoes that have green skins, contain solanine, which is toxic to dogs. Potato plants also contain solanine. Pieces of baked or boiled potatoes are fine to give your dog occasionally. 23

Onions

No, onions are toxic to dogs. 

onions
Image courtesy of Pixabay

No, dogs shouldn’t eat onions. Don’t add onions to anything that you give your dog. Large amounts are dangerous, and over time, even smaller amounts can cause anemia in dogs. Look for onions in the ingredients list of any human food you want to give your dog and avoid that food if it is listed.  24

Corn

Yes, corn is safe for dogs to eat, minus the cob. 

corn
Image courtesy of Pixabay

Yes, corn is safe for dogs to eat. In fact, there is often corn in commercial dog foods. They can have it as a snack off of the cob; don’t give your dog a cob to chew on, as it can cause an intestinal obstruction. Also, please hold the butter and salt. 25

Lettuce

Yes, lettuce is safe for dogs to eat. 

lettuce
Image courtesy of Pixabay

Yes, dogs can eat lettuce. Just make sure it’s washed well and that you cut it up into small pieces to prevent choking and obstruction. Also, keep in mind that some types, like iceberg lettuce, are not particularly nutritious, so while it won’t harm your dog, it isn’t something that you should give very often. 26

Garlic

No, garlic is toxic to dogs. 

garlic
Image courtesy of Pixabay

No, garlic is one of the human foods dogs can’t eat. It can cause anemia the same way that onions can, only garlic is even more potent. It is particularly dangerous to give garlic to dog breeds that originated in Japan (such as Akitas) because they tend to be more sensitive. Do not give anything containing garlic to any dogs, though. 27

Asparagus

Yes, asparagus is safe for dogs to eat – but only when cooked. 

asparagus
Image courtesy of Pixabay

Yes, dogs can eat asparagus, provided that it is cooked. Raw asparagus is hard to chew and swallow and can become a choking or obstruction hazard. Raw asparagus can also cause gas and stomach discomfort. 28

Green Beans

Yes, green beans are safe for dogs to eat. 

green beans
Image courtesy of Pixabay

Yes, green beans are one of the human food dogs can eat safely. In fact, green beans are a great substitute for other types of dog treats because they are low in calories and filled with nutrients. Some vets recommend them for dogs who need to lose weight. 29

Pickles

Yes, but only in moderation. 

pickles
Image courtesy of Pixabay

Yes, dogs can eat pickles in moderation. Pickles are cured cucumbers, which are one of the foods that are safe for dogs. Keep in mind, though, that pickles are very salty and should not be given in large amounts or frequently. Also, do not give your dogs pickles that contain garlic. 30

Spinach

Yes, spinach is safe for dogs to eat. 

spinach
Image courtesy of Pixabay

Yes, dogs can eat spinach. It contains fiber as well as vitamins A, B, C, and K. Spinach does contain oxalic acid, though, and this can inhibit calcium absorption. Your dog would really need to eat a lot of spinach to suffer this effect, though, so it’s likely not anything to worry about. 31

Bell Peppers

Yes, bell peppers are safe for dogs to eat. 

bell peppers
Image courtesy of Pixabay

Yes, dogs can eat bell peppers. They are sweet and contain vitamin C and antioxidants, making them a tasty and healthy snack for your dog. You can offer red, orange, yellow, or green bell peppers to see what kind your dog likes best, but red peppers are often said to be the most nutritious. 32

Zucchini

Yes, zucchini is safe for dogs to eat. 

zucchini
Image courtesy of Pixabay

Yes, dogs can eat zucchini. It is low in calories and can be given as a treat of added in small quantities to dog food to bulk it up without adding many calories. It is also mild in flavor and not likely to cause your dog to refuse to eat it. 33

Sweet Potatoes

Yes, but only when cooked. 

sweet potatoes
Image courtesy of Pixabay

Yes, dogs can eat cooked sweet potatoes. While raw sweet potatoes are not toxic to dogs, they can irritate the stomach, so be sure to cook them first. Sweet potatoes that are boiled or roasted make a great snack for your pup. 34

Nuts Dogs Can and Cannot Eat

Almonds

Yes, but only in moderation. 

almonds
Image courtesy of Pixabay

Yes, dogs can eat a few almonds. Like all nuts, they are high in fat and need to be chopped up to prevent choking or injury to the gastrointestinal tract, since dogs will generally try to swallow them whole or only partially chewed. Choose the unseasoned,  unsalted variety and limit the amount given. 35

Peanut Butter

Yes, but never peanut butter that contains xylitol. 

peanut butter
Image courtesy of Pixabay

Yes, peanut butter is safe for dogs to eat, with one caveat: Make sure that you choose a brand that does not contain xylitol. Xylitol is an artificial sweetener that is toxic to dogs. Peanut butter is high in fat, and you should choose the natural kind without lots of salt and sugar, if possible. 36

Pistachios

Yes, when shelled, but only in limited amounts. 

pistachios
Image courtesy of Pixabay

Yes, dogs can eat pistachios in limited amounts. Remove the shells and. as with all nuts, chop them up if you want to give them to your dog. Also, keep in mind that they contain a lot of fat. Choose the unsalted and unseasoned variety. Be aware that pistachios can grow mold, which is toxic to dogs. 37

Cashews

Yes, but only in limited amounts. 

cashews
Image courtesy of Pixabay

Yes, dogs can eat cashews in limited amounts. The same warnings apply to cashews as to other nuts: Cut them up and limit them due to their high fat content. Be aware that some dogs are allergic to cashews and other tree nuts, so watch for signs of allergy. 38

Pecans

Yes, but only in limited amounts. 

pecans
Image courtesy of Pixabay

Yes, dogs can eat pecans in limited amounts. Always remove the shells and chop up the nuts. Also, check the pecans for signs of mold, as the types that grow on pecans (and also walnuts) can be toxic to dogs and can cause digestive or neurological effects. 39

Other Foods Dogs Can and Cannot Eat

Shrimp

Yes, but only when cooked. 

shrimp
Image courtesy of Pixabay

Yes, dogs can eat shrimp, as long as it is cooked. Shrimp are healthy and full of protein and other nutrients. They do contain a lot of cholesterol, but that doesn’t tend to be a problem for most dogs. Remove the shells and tails before offering them to your dog. 40

Eggs

Yes, when cooked and without the shell. 

eggs
Image courtesy of Pixabay

Yes, eggs are one of the human foods dogs can eat safely, as long as they’re cooked and without the shell. It can be dangerous to give dogs raw eggs, as they can contain salmonella. Eggs are high in fat and calories, so if your dog is overweight or prone to stomach upset or pancreatitis, you should avoid this snack. 41

Cheese

Yes, but only in limited amounts. 

cheese
Image courtesy of Pixabay

Yes, dogs can eat cheese in limited amounts. Remember that cheese is high in fat and salt, so it should not be a large part of any dog’s diet. Also, do not give your dog seasoned or spiced cheese, as it could contain onions or garlic, and don’t give your dog blue cheese as some sources say the mold it contains can be dangerous to dogs. 42

Popcorn

Yes, popcorn is safe for dogs to eat. 

popcorn
Image courtesy of Pixabay

Yes, dogs can eat popcorn. It contains fiber and is a fun and tasty snack for dogs if given in moderation. Choose the unsalted and unbuttered varieties; popping it yourself on the stove or in an air popper is a good way to be sure that it doesn’t contain any harmful ingredients. 43

Cinnamon

Cinnamon shouldn’t be sprinkled on your dog’s food, but it’s okay when mixed in. 

cinnamon
Image courtesy of Pixabay

Dogs should not eat powdered cinnamon that has been sprinkled on their food. If it is mixed with other ingredients – in baked goods, for example – that is okay. The main issue is that they can inhale the powder, which is very irritating to the lungs, but that is not a danger in a baked dog treat. 44

Honey

Yes, honey is safe for most dogs to eat. 

honey
Image courtesy of Pixabay

Yes, most dogs can eat honey. If your dog is very young or immunocompromised, you should not give them honey, as there is a small risk of botulism, which can be deadly. It is also full of sugar, which dogs don’t need. Don’t give honey to dogs who are obese or who have diabetes. 45

Bread

Yes, but stick to plain white or wheat bread. 

bread
Image courtesy of Pixabay

Yes, dogs can eat bread as long as it is baked. Do not give your dog bread dough; it can rise and ferment in the stomach causing serious health problems. Choose plain white or wheat bread to avoid stomach upset from varieties that contain seeds, raisins, or other potentially harmful ingredients. 46

Turkey

Yes, but not the skin or bones. 

turkey
Image courtesy of Pixabay

Yes, turkey is one of the human foods dogs can eat, with a few caveats. First, don’t give your dog turkey skin. It’s best to stick to the white breast meat, as it is lower in fat than the dark leg or thigh meat. Do not give your dog turkey bones or turkey wings. And only plain turkey is appropriate; don’t give your dog turkey that has a lot of seasonings or salt on it. Finally, make sure the turkey is fully cooked. 47

Yogurt

Yes, yogurt is safe for most dogs to eat, as long as it doesn’t contain xylitol. 

yogurt
Image courtesy of Pixabay

Yes, dogs can eat yogurt. In fact, if your dog has taken antibiotics or has diarrhea, your vet might suggest that you offer some yogurt with live active cultures. Other dogs, however, can have trouble digesting yogurt due to its lactose content. If you do feed your dog yogurt, be particularly cautious that you do not choose one with xylitol, as this is toxic to dogs. 48

Tuna

Yes, but only when cooked. 

tuna
Image courtesy of Pixabay

Yes, dogs can eat cooked tuna. If you are using canned tuna, be aware of the salt content. Also, choose tuna packed in water, not oil; the oil is too fatty for your dog. Use the EDF Seafood Selector to avoid high levels of mercury and reduce overfishing. 49

Rice

Yes, rice is safe for dogs to eat. 

rice
Image courtesy of Pixabay

Yes, dogs can eat rice. Plain, cooked white rice is something you might be able to give a dog who is having stomach trouble. After a digestive issue, your vet might recommend feeding boiled chicken and rice with no seasonings or fats added. 50

What to Do If Your Dog Eats Something He Shouldn’t

Now that you know what foods are safe for dogs, it’s a good idea to know what to do if your pup eats food that’s toxic to dogs. If your dog does end up eating something he shouldn’t, try not to panic. You have a few options for getting the help your dog needs. The first is to call your dog’s veterinarian, who can advise you to either come into the office or to watch for signs of poisoning, obstruction, or other potential problems. If it’s after hours, you can try calling an emergency veterinarian. Another option is to call a pet poison control line. Be aware that there is a fee to use these services. Two that we can recommend are the ASPCA Animal Poison Control at (888) 426-4435 and the Pet Poison Helpline at (855) 764-7661.

In some cases, you might be told to induce vomiting in your dog. It is helpful to keep hydrogen peroxide on hand in case you need to do this. Do not induce vomiting unless your veterinarian or someone from one of the pet poison control hotlines advises you to do so, however, because in some cases, vomiting can make the situation worse. 51

Article Sources

Pet News Daily uses only high-quality sources, including peer-reviewed studies, to support the facts within our articles. Read our editorial process to learn more about how we fact-check and keep our content accurate, reliable, and trustworthy.

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Dr. Jennifer Coates
Dr. Jennifer Coates was valedictorian of her graduating class at the VA-MD Regional College of Veterinary Medicine and has practiced in Virginia, Wyoming, and Colorado. She is also the author of numerous articles and books including the Dictionary of Veterinary Terms: Vet-Speak Deciphered for the Non-Veterinarian.