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The Best High Fiber Dog Food

Our veterinarians research and recommend the best products. Learn more about our process. We may receive a commission on purchases made from our links.

High fiber dog foods can help your dog with several health concerns. Between weight management for overweight pups to digestion improvement, your dog may benefit from a high fiber diet to maintain a comfortable and healthy life.

Our vet advisor, Dr. Jennifer Coates, DVM, reviewed dozens of high fiber dog foods, and she chose Hill’s Prescription Diet Dry Dog Food, w/d Multi-Benefit as her top pick. With multiple benefits such as weight, glucose, and urinary management, it’s a great option for many dogs who could benefit from a high fiber diet. Read how she chose the top 5.

Our Vet’s Top Pick

Hill’s Prescription Diet Dry Dog Food, WD Multi-Benefit

For the best in high fiber dog foods, look no further than Hill’s Prescription Diet Dry Dog Food, WD Multi-Benefit.

If your dog is having problems with an upset stomach, you may want to try a few home remedies before switching to a high fiber dog food. It may also be a good idea to familiarize yourself with your dog’s digestion so that you’re better equipped to handle any concerns that may arise.

Our Vet’s Top 5 High Fiber Dog Foods

Here are the top picks from our veterinarian. Compare the ratings and features of different products.

Editor’s Picks Brand Rating Wet or Dry Life Stage-Specific Formulas Weight Management
Best Overall Hill’s Prescription Diet Dry Dog Food, WD Multi-Benefit 4.7 Dry
Best Budget Buy Natural Balance Fat Dogs Low Calorie Dry Dog Food 4.5 Dry
Best for Puppies Blue Buffalo Life Protection Formula Puppy Chicken & Brown Rice Recipe Dry Dog Food 4.6 Dry
Best for Senior Dogs Blue Buffalo Life Protection Formula Senior Dog Food 4.7 Dry
Best Wet Hill’s Science Diet Dog Food, Adult, Light for Healthy Weight & Weight Management 4.8 Wet

*Ratings are on a scale of 1 to 5 and based on reviews, feedback, and opinions of actual customers

Who Should Eat a High Fiber Dog Food

  • Frequently constipated – A high fiber diet can help lessen the frequency of constipation struggles. Talk to your veterinarian first if your dog’s constipation is severe, however. High fiber foods aren’t right under all circumstances.
  • Overeaters – High fiber food makes dogs feel fuller faster and for longer, which can help reduce overeating and help with weight management.1
  • Other health problems – High fiber diets can be used to manage a variety of health conditions including anal gland impactions, diarrhea, and diabetes mellitus.2

Who Should Not Eat a High Fiber Dog Food

  • Gassy dogs – If your pup has especially pungent or frequent gas, then extra fiber may be to blame or make it worse.
  • Dogs with no health issues on an already balanced diet – Too much fiber can decrease the absorption of nutrients and result in loose stools and more frequent defecation.3 If your dog is already on a balanced diet and has no health concerns, he probably doesn’t need high fiber dog food.

Research Tips (From a Veterinarian)

Talk to your veterinarian to determine the best food based on your dog’s particular needs, but if you have a good handle on what you’re looking for, you’ll still want to keep a few things in mind.

  1. Pick the right amount of the right types of fiber – Fiber comes in two forms – soluble and insoluble. The easiest way to compare fiber levels in dog foods is to look at the maximum crude fiber level reported on the guaranteed analysis. However, crude fiber doesn’t measure a food’s level of insoluble fiber so it isn’t a perfect measure – just the best we have that is readily available.4
  2. Get the prescription – High fiber prescription diets, like Hill’s w/d, generally contain more fiber than do over-the-counter foods and will provide more information about the food’s fiber content on the label.
  3. Don’t skimp on other nutrients – All foods, regardless of fiber content, need to provide complete and balanced nutrition based on a dog’s stage of life and other factors. Only feed foods that are labeled with an appropriate AAFCO (Association of American Feed Control Officials) statement of nutritional adequacy.
  4. Look for respected brands – Only purchase foods from companies that have a well-deserved reputation for making quality products.

How Much Do They Cost?

Between $45 and $90 a month

There’s no way around it – you get what you pay for with high fiber dog foods. You’ll pay more for the prescription foods that require your vet’s authorization, but you’ll get a higher quality product, too. But if your dog’s problems aren’t severe, a less expensive, over-the-counter product may do the trick. All things considered, you should expect to spend between $45 and $90 a month on your dog’s fiber-rich food.

Our Methodology: Why Trust Pet Life Today

I have only recommended high fiber foods made by companies with a well-deserved reputation for their excellent quality control standards and who make foods that follow AAFCO (Association of American Feed Control Officials) guidelines. The products I’ve selected are commonly recommended by veterinarians, and vets report having had good success using the products listed, which has led me to these picks. For significant health problems, you should talk to your veterinarian to determine the best food based on your dog’s particular needs. – Dr. Jennifer Coates, DVM

The Best High Fiber Dog Foods: Full Reviews

Our Vet’s Top Pick

Hill’s Prescription Diet Dry Dog Food, WD Multi-Benefit

For the best in high fiber dog foods, look no further than Hill’s Prescription Diet Dry Dog Food, WD Multi-Benefit.

Hill’s Prescription Diet Dry Dog Food, w/d Multi-Benefit Digestive/Weight/Glucose/Urinary Management has a very high crude fiber percentage (a maximum of 16%) and it includes both soluble and insoluble fibers. It’s hard to find another well-made food that contains more fiber than Hill’s w/d.

Once upon a time, this was only available at your vet’s office. Though you can still usually pick it up at your vet’s office, you can now order online as well – with veterinary authorization. There is also a canned formula if that’s a better match for your dog’s needs or you’re interested in feeding both wet and dry food.

Pros
  • For digestion, glucose, urinary, or weight problems
  • Therapeutic L-carnitine to boost fat metabolism
  • Natural ingredients
Cons
  • Requires veterinary authorization
  • Acquired taste
Best Budget

Natural Balance Fat Dogs Low-Calorie Dry Dog Food

For a low-cost high fiber dog food, check out Natural Balance Fat Dogs Low-Calorie Dry Dog Food.

The Natural Balance Fat Dogs Low-Calorie Dry Dog Food, Chicken Meal, Salmon Meal, Garbanzo Beans, Peas & Oatmeal contains an impressive ingredient list. For an over-the-counter food, the crude fiber level (maximum 10.5%) is quite high.

It’s also an inexpensive food that you can purchase without veterinary authorization.

Pros
  • L-carnitine for healthy weight
  • Balanced nutrition for long-term use
  • Proprietary fiber and protein blend
Cons
  • No flavor variety for picky pups
  • May trigger food sensitivities
Best for Puppy

Blue Buffalo Life Protection Formula Puppy Chicken & Brown Rice Recipe Dry Dog Food

If your puppy needs a bit more fiber in his diet, then try the Blue Buffalo Life Protection Formula Puppy Chicken & Brown Rice Recipe Dry Dog Food.

Most puppy foods are low in fiber to increase their energy density. Blue Buffalo Life Protection Formula Puppy Chicken & Brown Rice Recipe Dry Dog Food has a relatively high crude fiber content (maximum 5%) for a puppy food. Typically, it’s lower to make sure your dog doesn’t get full too quickly before he consumes the extra nutrients he needs to grow.

There is also a similar large breed puppy formula if your puppy is going to be a big dog. So no matter what your dog’s breed, Blue Buffalo has a high fiber option for him.

Pros
  • Proprietary “Lifesource Bits” support immune system
  • Contains antioxidant-rich vitamins and minerals
  • Cold-formed kibble preserves potency
Cons
  • Moderate fiber levels may not be enough for some dogs
  • May trigger food sensitivities
Best for Seniors

Blue Buffalo Life Protection Formula Senior Dog Food

Blue Buffalo Life Protection Formula Senior Dog Food will give your senior dog the boost to his digestion he needs.

Blue Buffalo Life Protection Formula Senior Dog Food, Natural Dry Dog Food for Senior Dogs has a relatively high crude fiber (maximum 7%). There are a variety of sizes so you can give the food a try with a smaller bag and then switch to a larger bag for long-term use.

There are also formulas for senior large and small breeds dogs, so you can get the exact food your dog needs, no matter the breed. As with any food, the manufacturer recommends you transition your dog to a new diet gradually so as to prevent upsetting your dog’s stomach.

Pros
  • Proprietary “Lifesource Bits” support immune system
  • Contains glucosamine for healthy joints and mobility
  • Cold-formed kibble preserves potency
Cons
  • No flavor variety for picky dogs
  • May trigger food sensitivities
Best Wet Dog Food

Hill’s Science Diet Dog Food, Adult, Light for Healthy Weight & Weight Management

If you’re looking for a wet dog food that has high fiber content, consider Hill’s Science Diet Dog Food, Adult, Light for Healthy Weight & Weight Management.

If you’re looking for a wet dog food that’s high in fiber, consider Hill’s Science Diet Dog Food, Adult, Light for Healthy Weight & Weight Management. On a dry matter basis (a calculation that takes into account the “extra” water in canned food), you can see that this over-the-counter diet has a very high crude fiber level (maximum 13%). It’s a light food that contains a lean protein source, liver, to help your overweight pup get back to a healthy weight.

The added omega-6 fatty acids and vitamin E will help your dog maintain healthy skin and coat, as well – so if that’s a concern, this food can help address that problem, too.

Pros
  • Low-calorie for weight management
  • Made with natural ingredients
  • Made in the USA
  • 100% money-back guarantee
Cons
  • Acquired taste
  • Multiple sources of protein, which may trigger allergies

Frequently Asked Questions

How can I add more fiber to my dog’s diet?

There are other ways to add fiber into your dog’s diet if you’re not keen to switch his food, so don’t stress if these choices don’t work for you. You can add in fiber-rich treats or table foods like carrots or apples, but these shouldn’t provide more than 10% of your dog’s total calories each day. Dogs can also take fiber supplements, such as psyllium, but talk to your veterinarian before you resort to this.

How much fiber should a dog have?

Fiber isn’t considered an essential nutrient for dogs. Some individuals need very little, while others benefit from more. Your veterinarian can make a recommendation based on your dog’s situation. Most standard dog foods have between 2% and 4% fiber. A high fiber food will typically have between 7% and 13%.

Is pumpkin a good source of fiber for dogs?

Pumpkin has more fiber than other fruits and vegetables, so it’s often recommended as a good source of fiber for dogs. It includes several other nutrients, like vitamins A, E, and C, as well as potassium and iron, that are part of a well-balanced diet. It should be noted, though, that the fiber in pumpkin won’t make dramatic changes – you’d have to feed a lot of pumpkin to equal the amount of fiber in most high fiber dog foods.5It can help to maintain an otherwise high fiber diet, though.

Can too much fiber cause constipation in dogs?

Though it is more likely that too little fiber will cause constipation, the opposite can also be true. Too much can lead to constipation and even cause your dog to have a hard time absorbing vitamins, minerals, and other important nutrients from his food.6  Though you may not know right away if your dog is constipated, you’ll be able to tell if he’s showing discomfort when going and if his excrement is particularly hard and comes out as individual pellets. The important takeaway is that fiber is very closely related to your pup’s excrement and if you’re concerned, you may need to address fiber consumption with your vet.

Article Sources

Pet News Daily uses only high-quality sources, including peer-reviewed studies, to support the facts within our articles. Read our editorial process to learn more about how we fact-check and keep our content accurate, reliable, and trustworthy.

  1. Flickinger B. The role of fiber in weight loss diets. Aaha.org. Published. August 31, 2011. Accessed March 5, 2021.
  2. Linder D. What’s the best diet for my dog with diabetes? Vetnutrition.tufts.edu. Published January, 2020. Accessed March 5, 2021.
  3. National Academy of Sciences. Your dog’s nutritional needs: A science-based guide for pet owners. Nap.edu. Published 2006. Accessed March 5, 2021.
  4. Heinze C. Fiber frustrations. Vetnutrition.tufts.edu. Published November, 2019. Accessed March 18, 2021.
  5. Freeman L. The problem with pumpkin. Vetnutrition.tufts.edu. Accessed March 5, 2021.
  6. Tortola L, Zaine L, Vasconcellos R, et al. Psyllium (plantago psyllium) uses in the management of constipation in dogs. Vin.com. Accessed March 5, 2021.
Dr. Jennifer Coates
Dr. Jennifer Coats, DVM was Valedictorian of her graduating class at the VA-MD Regional College of Veterinary Medicine. She has practiced in Virginia, Wyoming, and Colorado and has authored numerous articles and books, including the Dictionary of Veterinary Terms, Vet-Speak Deciphered for the Non-Veterinarian. She lives in Fort Collins, Colorado with her husband, children, and her dog and cat (Apollo and Minerva).